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KnackChap

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10 minutes ago, KunjanPSD said:

Some of them just take it via Zerodha's statement. There is Tijori Finance which does a good job but that requires sub.

Loading this up in excel and changing them to +/- values takes a bit of time.

Just download the account statement man. It's piss easy. Debits are charges and purchases, credits are inflows and sales. Shouldn't take more than 10 mins in excel. 

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1 hour ago, Mr. Comingle said:

Just download the account statement man. It's piss easy. Debits are charges and purchases, credits are inflows and sales. Shouldn't take more than 10 mins in excel. 

Statement only shows credit and debit from funds, doesn't have the current value of holdings and quantity.

That is given in the tradebook and I think for that I will need to add current value for each particular entry.

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1 hour ago, KunjanPSD said:

Statement only shows credit and debit from funds, doesn't have the current value of holdings and quantity.

That is given in the tradebook and I think for that I will need to add current value for each particular entry.

Havent tried but I heard it is way easier to do this in Google sheets as it also has formulas to look up share price based on symbol.  See if you can explore it and prepare a custom sheet as a one time activity

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For the purpose of buying Tax saving funds, either on Kuvera or even direct from AMC like Mirae's website, is it possible that I can use my own bank account instead of my dad's to make payment? But the investment will be in the name of my dad.

I can see that I have to accept a condition that the payment should be made from a registered bank account only but is it enforced? Or just a formality?

 

The problem is that my dad uses UCO Bank and it is not even registering on UPI for some reason. My dad absolutely don't want anything to do with NetBanking or phone banking.

Literally out of options instead of going via a distributor.

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1 hour ago, KunjanPSD said:

For the purpose of buying Tax saving funds, either on Kuvera or even direct from AMC like Mirae's website, is it possible that I can use my own bank account instead of my dad's to make payment? But the investment will be in the name of my dad.

I can see that I have to accept a condition that the payment should be made from a registered bank account only but is it enforced? Or just a formality?

 

The problem is that my dad uses UCO Bank and it is not even registering on UPI for some reason. My dad absolutely don't want anything to do with NetBanking or phone banking.

Literally out of options instead of going via a distributor.

 

His account. If it's made from any other account, generally units won't alloted. 

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15 minutes ago, Bird Bird Bird said:

 

His account. If it's made from any other account, generally units won't alloted. 

Great.

Now I have to convince him for getting NetBanking enabled or figure the UPI hassle out.

Perfect.

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2 hours ago, KunjanPSD said:

For the purpose of buying Tax saving funds, either on Kuvera or even direct from AMC like Mirae's website, is it possible that I can use my own bank account instead of my dad's to make payment? But the investment will be in the name of my dad.

I can see that I have to accept a condition that the payment should be made from a registered bank account only but is it enforced? Or just a formality?

 

The problem is that my dad uses UCO Bank and it is not even registering on UPI for some reason. My dad absolutely don't want anything to do with NetBanking or phone banking.

Literally out of options instead of going via a distributor.

Payment has to come from his account only . Just go via distributor . You are investing 1.5L for 3 years in tax saving funds . The difference here in investing directly through AMC versus investing through agents is hardly worth the hassle .

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19 minutes ago, Krazyniks said:

Payment has to come from his account only . Just go via distributor . You are investing 1.5L for 3 years in tax saving funds . The difference here in investing directly through AMC versus investing through agents is hardly worth the hassle .

Yeah, true.

Still got time till 31st March so will try to get the UPI fixed otherwise distributor it is.

It's annoying when parents just don't want to enable such ease of use features because of potential phising/fraud attempts.

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5 minutes ago, KunjanPSD said:

Yeah, true.

Still got time till 31st March so will try to get the UPI fixed otherwise distributor it is.

It's annoying when parents just don't want to enable such ease of use features because of potential phising/fraud attempts.

 

Get netbanking activated. 

 

You can do it for them from anywhere. 

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2 minutes ago, Bird Bird Bird said:

 

Get netbanking activated. 

 

You can do it for them from anywhere. 

My dad doesn't want to.

It's really hectic handling all of this without NetBanking and UCO Bank is such a dud because you need debit card to get it done online and my dad doesn't have one.

 

Need to go to the branch.

 

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Query on mutual funds SIP. I have read everywhere that NAV doesn't matter at all and returns are same in mutual funds. I get this point and have seen it in detail.

My question is - if I am already doing SIP in a specific mutual fund. Would timing of my SIP matter based on NAV? Like if market is down, my MF's NAV also goes down the same day. If I add Funds at that time, and suppose I get lower NAV rates. Is it better? Or would it still not matter.

See this pic. Going by my transactions, it seems lower NAVs are giving me better returns. Couldn't find this answer anywhere since everyone is talking about only choosing mutual funds on NAV not existing one. 629630b480813b937600aa0a9b516af4.jpg

Edited by dante77
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6 minutes ago, dante77 said:

Query on mutual funds SIP. I have read everywhere that NAV doesn't matter at all and returns are same in mutual funds. I get this point and have seen it in detail.

My question is - if I am already doing SIP in a specific mutual fund. Would timing of my SIP matter based on NAV? Like if market is down, my MF's NAV also goes down the same day. If I add Funds at that time, and suppose I get lower NAV rates. Is it better? Or would it still not matter.

See this pic. Going by my transactions, it seems lower NAVs are giving me better returns. Couldn't find this answer anywhere since everyone is talking about only choosing mutual funds on NAV not existing one. 629630b480813b937600aa0a9b516af4.jpg

I mean, yeah? 

If you purchase something at a lower price, you will get more money when it increases in value. 

What people say is that it's pretty hard to time your investment because you really don't know if the price truly is bottom and it's not going to fall further and vice versa. You might catch a falling knife or miss out on a rally in a stock which is already at a high but increasing more.

So just forget about all that and invest in the long term growth. 

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38 minutes ago, dante77 said:

Like if market is down, my MF's NAV also goes down the same day. If I add Funds at that time, and suppose I get lower NAV rates.

Assuming when you say lower NAV, higher NAV, you are talking about the same fund?

 

(1) Unless it is an index fund, I don't think the NAV coming down will be directly proportional to the Market performance.

(2) NAV is calculated every day after market close. So assume you see at 7 PM , the NAV is low, and you add some funds, the NAV applicable for your new investment will not be the value at 7PM but rather the next day's end of day NAV. So if market does well the next day, your NAV might end up being higher than what triggered you to invest in the first place. 

(3) The Idea of SIPs for ME is to just forget about timing the market assuming investment is for long term and the minor NAV differences wouldn't matter much and there is always a case here as well, just like stocks, you cannot predict and time the purchase accurately

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1 hour ago, dante77 said:

Query on mutual funds SIP. I have read everywhere that NAV doesn't matter at all and returns are same in mutual funds. I get this point and have seen it in detail.

NAV is the cost per unit of the mutual you're buying into. Think of it as cost of buying one share in the fund. As the value of the assets the fund holds increases the NAV of the fund also goes up, meaning you can redeem the fund at a higher selling price that you purchased it formand vice versa when the value of assets decreases

 

 

Buying at a low cost is always ideal but there are factors that don't make it viable. You can't time the market, in that effort you'll either end up investing at peaks or not investing at all waiting for the dip, which is worse in the long term.

 

SIPs invest at regular intervals and average out the returns from peaks and dips in the long term (<10 year period)

 

What you can do it, during unnatural market dips like the 1500 point one that happened recently, you can do an additional lumpsum investment of either one months worth of SIP installment or fraction of it that you are comfortable with.

Edited by El Tigre Chino
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1 hour ago, dante77 said:

Query on mutual funds SIP. I have read everywhere that NAV doesn't matter at all and returns are same in mutual funds. I get this point and have seen it in detail.

My question is - if I am already doing SIP in a specific mutual fund. Would timing of my SIP matter based on NAV? Like if market is down, my MF's NAV also goes down the same day. If I add Funds at that time, and suppose I get lower NAV rates. Is it better? Or would it still not matter.

See this pic. Going by my transactions, it seems lower NAVs are giving me better returns. Couldn't find this answer anywhere since everyone is talking about only choosing mutual funds on NAV not existing one. 629630b480813b937600aa0a9b516af4.jpg

 

Of course. NAV is just like the price of stock for that particular day, except it's not for 1 stock, but a bucket of them, based on weightage.

If you want to time the market, wait till around 2-2:30 pm, and see the bearishness of the market + top 10-15 stocks of the MF you want to invest in. If the heavyweights go down (in the MF), invest before 3 pm. Anything beyond will be allocated next day NAV as MF investment cut off time is 3 pm (payment should be made by they time). 

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1 hour ago, dante77 said:

Query on mutual funds SIP. I have read everywhere that NAV doesn't matter at all and returns are same in mutual funds. I get this point and have seen it in detail.

My question is - if I am already doing SIP in a specific mutual fund. Would timing of my SIP matter based on NAV? Like if market is down, my MF's NAV also goes down the same day. If I add Funds at that time, and suppose I get lower NAV rates. Is it better? Or would it still not matter.

See this pic. Going by my transactions, it seems lower NAVs are giving me better returns. Couldn't find this answer anywhere since everyone is talking about only choosing mutual funds on NAV not existing one. 629630b480813b937600aa0a9b516af4.jpg

 

Of course. NAV is just like the price of stock for that particular day, except it's not for 1 stock, but a bucket of them, based on weightage.

If you want to time the market, wait till around 2-2:30 pm, and see the bearishness of the market + top 10-15 stocks of the MF you want to invest in. If the heavyweights go down (in the MF), invest before 3 pm. Anything beyond will be allocated next day NAV as MF investment cut off time is 3 pm (payment should be made by they time). 

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1 hour ago, Mr. Comingle said:

I mean, yeah? 

If you purchase something at a lower price, you will get more money when it increases in value. 

What people say is that it's pretty hard to time your investment because you really don't know if the price truly is bottom and it's not going to fall further and vice versa. You might catch a falling knife or miss out on a rally in a stock which is already at a high but increasing more.

So just forget about all that and invest in the long term growth. 

 

yes, it can fall further but it is still better than peak, right? with MF, you are gonna put that money in that month anyway, why not take even the slightest fall if someone has time?

34 minutes ago, Pacifier said:

Assuming when you say lower NAV, higher NAV, you are talking about the same fund?

 

(1) Unless it is an index fund, I don't think the NAV coming down will be directly proportional to the Market performance.

(2) NAV is calculated every day after market close. So assume you see at 7 PM , the NAV is low, and you add some funds, the NAV applicable for your new investment will not be the value at 7PM but rather the next day's end of day NAV. So if market does well the next day, your NAV might end up being higher than what triggered you to invest in the first place. 

(3) The Idea of SIPs for ME is to just forget about timing the market assuming investment is for long term and the minor NAV differences wouldn't matter much and there is always a case here as well, just like stocks, you cannot predict and time the purchase accurately

 

1.) I am tracking some MFs NAV and it seems it is coming down proportional to market. The recent 3% percent dip in market in a single day made NAV lower

2.) I know, I am speaking if hypothetically some gets the exact NAV he wants. Usually when a dip like 3% happens in a single day, market takes 2-3 days to recover, enough days to put considerable amount as lumpsum in MFs.

3.) Agree, that is actually the idea behind SIPs with MFs. We don't have time to deal with all this, so just put it every month and forget. Again, I am just saying if someone has time and want to play, it is gonna benefit I think.

 

16 minutes ago, El Tigre Chino said:

NAV is the cost per unit of the mutual you're buying into. Think of it as cost of buying one share in the fund. As the value of the assets the fund holds increases the NAV of the fund also goes up, meaning you can redeem the fund at a higher selling price that you purchased it formand vice versa when the value of assets decreases

 

 

Buying at a low cost is always ideal but there are factors that don't make it viable. You can't time the market, in that effort you'll either end up investing at peaks or not investing at all waiting for the dip, which is worse in the long term.

 

SIPs invest at regular intervals and average out the returns from peaks and dips in the long term (<10 year period)

 

What you can do it, during unnatural market dips like the 1500 point one that happened recently, you can do an additional lumpsum investment of either one months worth of SIP installment or fraction of it that you are comfortable with.

 

14 minutes ago, Bird Bird Bird said:

 

Of course. NAV is just like the price of stock for that particular day, except it's not for 1 stock, but a bucket of them, based on weightage.

If you want to time the market, wait till around 2-2:30 pm, and see the bearishness of the market + top 10-15 stocks of the MF you want to invest in. If the heavyweights go down (in the MF), invest before 3 pm. Anything beyond will be allocated next day NAV as MF investment cut off time is 3 pm (payment should be made by they time). 

Thanks for confirmation. Just couldn't find anything in the internet despite searching a lot. Everyone is like - don't choose based on low NAV and all. 

 

Like I said, it takes market at least 2-3 days time to recover itself from a 2-3% correction. The ideal scenario is, keep doing SIP like you normally do but if you have some available funds, then we can always add more funds in our MFs just like we buy on dip. Basically buy the MF NAV dip.

 

So, overall if I have time, I'll wait for some market correction and then invest the same or larger amount which I was  gonna invest anyway or if you have funds, do both.

Edited by dante77
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