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HundredProofSam

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 Back feels good after this.

 

But isn't he asking to arc the back forward too much while sqautting ? (From 4 min 30 second mark and 8 min sqauts start)

Shouldn't the back be straight ? Or it is better to always arch the back forward instead of straight ?

 

A bit confused if I have been doing squats wrong with a neutral back instead of keeping the chest forward.

 

I mean if the chest is forward there would be a forward arc in the back.

Does this mean straight only ?

 

@Freelancer

Edited by GunnerY2J

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Done.

 

After I was done for today, randomly found this 1000 squats and lunges challenge.

 

Had thought would do 500, but the lady said in between I challenge you to do 500 more.

and could do around 875 only in the same time frame (she is fast), so did a third extra set to make it 1000.

 

 

The last combination of squat and reverse lunge together is brutal.

 

 

Edit : I have already eaten 2 full meals after the workout in 4 hours and still easily getting hungry.

Edited by GunnerY2J

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On 1/22/2020 at 6:12 PM, GunnerY2J said:

 Back feels good after this.

 

But isn't he asking to arc the back forward too much while sqautting ? (From 4 min 30 second mark and 8 min sqauts start)

Shouldn't the back be straight ? Or it is better to always arch the back forward instead of straight ?

 

A bit confused if I have been doing squats wrong with a neutral back instead of keeping the chest forward.

 

I mean if the chest is forward there would be a forward arc in the back.

Does this mean straight only ?

 

@Freelancer

Hey just curious as in what are your current goals in terms of fitness or strength?

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2 hours ago, gs_RoXxX said:

Hey just curious as in what are your current goals in terms of fitness or strength?

Stay pain free,

Exercise daily (as it does feel good)

Develop some leg (along with some leg muscles) and core strength.

 

 

And maybe :

make into the local football team again while being injury free (this is what's improbable and maybe I want to delay it but makes me want to exercise thinking I have a chance)

 

 

 

 

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So after almost a year's break (thank you genetically inferior knees) did a proper leg workout. Deadlifts, barbell squats, 250 pound leg press, hamstring curls, the works. Couldn't get down the stairs without holding railings after the workout but felt great. That was 5 days ago and they're still soar. Looks like I can only fit one solid heavy leg day per week. 15 years ago I could've fit 3 per week while binge drinking on weekends and getting blacked out. Getting old fking sucks.

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24 minutes ago, CarbonCore said:

So after almost a year's break (thank you genetically inferior knees) did a proper leg workout. Deadlifts, barbell squats, 250 pound leg press, hamstring curls, the works. Couldn't get down the stairs without holding railings after the workout but felt great. That was 5 days ago and they're still soar. Looks like I can only fit one solid heavy leg day per week. 15 years ago I could've fit 3 per week while binge drinking on weekends and getting blacked out. Getting old fking sucks.

This looks pretty intense.

 

Any chance one could build legs without weights ? 

Like by 500 squats and lunges each ?

Did it on Thursday and felt mildly  sore for the next two days.

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2 hours ago, GunnerY2J said:

This looks pretty intense.

 

Any chance one could build legs without weights ? 

Like by 500 squats and lunges each ?

Did it on Thursday and felt mildly  sore for the next two days.

 

You can build endurance but you can't build muscle with that high repetition. In fact super high reps actually start eating your muscles for energy by breaking them down for glucose. The golden range is 8-12 reps till failure for building muscles. There's also two kinds of muscles in your leg, twitch muscles and slow acting one. Twitch gives you that explosive power that sprinters, jumpers and football players have that lets you move fast, while slow acting ones give you actual strength. High reps might build your twitch muscles and improve cardio (because anything legs = cardio) but not your quads or glutes. 

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56 minutes ago, CarbonCore said:

There's also two kinds of muscles in your leg, twitch muscles and slow acting one. Twitch gives you that explosive power that sprinters, jumpers and football players have that lets you move fast, while slow acting ones give you actual strength. High reps might build your twitch muscles and improve cardio (because anything legs = cardio) but not your quads or glutes. 

Yes, I read about these two muscles in physical education.

Correct me if wrong but I remember their names to be : slow twitch muscles and fast twitch muscles.

 

So, better to avoid lengthy reps and continue the 40 second set variations of the 7 minute leg exercises ? (following YouTube)

Weights I want to avoid due to possible back pain from the disc and I have a weak upper body.

 

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, CarbonCore said:

So after almost a year's break (thank you genetically inferior knees) did a proper leg workout. Deadlifts, barbell squats, 250 pound leg press, hamstring curls, the works. Couldn't get down the stairs without holding railings after the workout but felt great. That was 5 days ago and they're still soar. Looks like I can only fit one solid heavy leg day per week. 15 years ago I could've fit 3 per week while binge drinking on weekends and getting blacked out. Getting old fking sucks.

Dude, don't do deadlifts if you are just getting back into gym. That is one of those exercises which doesn't provide enough return when compared to the risk you are taking in.

And also, I would recommend to swap weighted sumo squats over deadlifts for your legs. 

Keep deadlifts mainly for your back routine and start with them once you don't get muscle soreness for a week.

 

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1 hour ago, CarbonCore said:

 

You can build endurance but you can't build muscle with that high repetition. In fact super high reps actually start eating your muscles for energy by breaking them down for glucose. The golden range is 8-12 reps till failure for building muscles. There's also two kinds of muscles in your leg, twitch muscles and slow acting one. Twitch gives you that explosive power that sprinters, jumpers and football players have that lets you move fast, while slow acting ones give you actual strength. High reps might build your twitch muscles and improve cardio (because anything legs = cardio) but not your quads or glutes. 

That's actually not entirely correct.

High repetition sets make your muscles be habituated to low oxygen and creatine environment. After a while, when new fibres get constructed they will not only provide you better endurance but also will be able to produce the same power with less resources and in presence of excess resources increase your max capability, which in turn increase your muscle size since now bigger and stronger muscles will replace them in future.

I am not saying that you can do high rep regime everyday but once or twice a week won't be enough to increase glycogen breakdown to such extent that you lose muscle.

Also, 8-12 reps till muscle failure is not recommended because then the same muscles won't be able to do their secondary job of being "support muscles" the next day/days.

8-12 reps till your muscles get tensed up i.e. that a rope is tightly winded around your muscle.

Aim for muscle failure and max only once a month.

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1 hour ago, kunjanp said:

That's actually not entirely correct.

High repetition sets make your muscles be habituated to low oxygen and creatine environment. After a while, when new fibres get constructed they will not only provide you better endurance but also will be able to produce the same power with less resources and in presence of excess resources increase your max capability, which in turn increase your muscle size since now bigger and stronger muscles will replace them in future.

I am not saying that you can do high rep regime everyday but once or twice a week won't be enough to increase glycogen breakdown to such extent that you lose muscle.

Also, 8-12 reps till muscle failure is not recommended because then the same muscles won't be able to do their secondary job of being "support muscles" the next day/days.

8-12 reps till your muscles get tensed up i.e. that a rope is tightly winded around your muscle.

Aim for muscle failure and max only once a month.

 

That's what I meant by increasing endurance. High reps like 500 squats wont increase your muscle mass but they will increase your lactate threshold, VO2 max and eventually use less ATP and oxygen for same activity. Also 8-12 rep twice a week has worked for me till now (actually 6-8 now) because I use mostly isolation machines. So the other muscle groups can be sore next day and I can still power through. 

 

1 hour ago, GunnerY2J said:

Yes, I read about these two muscles in physical education.

Correct me if wrong but I remember their names to be : slow twitch muscles and fast twitch muscles.

 

So, better to avoid lengthy reps and continue the 40 second set variations of the 7 minute leg exercises ? (following YouTube)

Weights I want to avoid due to possible back pain from the disc and I have a weak upper body.

 

Entirely up to your goal. But routines like squats or bench press are really meant for heavy weights because they're taxing on your weak joint like knees and shoulders. 500+ squats wont do any good to your knee long term, I'd rather suggest cycling or eliptical, or even running in proper form. Or go to the gym and use isolation machines like leg press and leg curls to completely remove your back/upper body from equation and target local muscles.

 

1 hour ago, kunjanp said:

Dude, don't do deadlifts if you are just getting back into gym. That is one of those exercises which doesn't provide enough return when compared to the risk you are taking in.

And also, I would recommend to swap weighted sumo squats over deadlifts for your legs. 

Keep deadlifts mainly for your back routine and start with them once you don't get muscle soreness for a week.

 

Yeah I hate deadlifts. Risky af and my grip goes out before my hamstrings lol. Will try cables next time, there's some great substitute routine.

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Oh right, I have been reading squats and lunges strengthen your knees and even low back.

Would do high reps thing once a week then.

 

Eleptical, I have now got at a high level and a bit bored of it.(although it is very tough everytime and I am unable to beat my previous 575 calories in 50 minutes)

 

But yes, eleptical is an amazing and very tiring workout without stressing anything,

Very short distance cycling I do everyday  - would add more.

 

Helpful advice here, thanks.

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Fun Fact:- Deadlift is not a back exercise. Deadlifts works primarily on glutes , quads , adductors , hams with minimal contribtution of back ( it works in stabilizing your core muscles )

 

Also going to failure every session is not a good idea from hypertrophy pov because the fatigue generated from training to failure will hamper your performance in the next set which will lead to compromise in volume which is the main driver of hypertrophy so always keep 2-3 reps in tank or say stop 2-3 reps shy of failure. 

 

Also no exercise is risky and every exercise is risky if you don't micromanage the load and fatigue. Inury only occurs when you load the joint beyond its current capacity or doing too much work(volume) too soon!!

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15 hours ago, gs_RoXxX said:

Fun Fact:- Deadlift is not a back exercise. Deadlifts works primarily on glutes , quads , adductors , hams with minimal contribtution of back ( it works in stabilizing your core muscles )

 

Also going to failure every session is not a good idea from hypertrophy pov because the fatigue generated from training to failure will hamper your performance in the next set which will lead to compromise in volume which is the main driver of hypertrophy so always keep 2-3 reps in tank or say stop 2-3 reps shy of failure. 

 

Also no exercise is risky and every exercise is risky if you don't micromanage the load and fatigue. Inury only occurs when you load the joint beyond its current capacity or doing too much work(volume) too soon!!

 

Yeah I know deadlifts are for hamstrings and glutes, but I'm scared shitless about involving any back movement with super heavy lifts, even with support belt on Smith machine. Heck even for squats I'm using cable machine now for compounds and keeping my back straight and vertical. I've had wrist, knee and groin injuries before but they tend to heal completely in couple of weeks or a month max. I'm not sure a back injury will heal in a lifetime.

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